Neighbours talking over the garden gate has long been a tradition. They share gardening tips, complain about the weather and pests yet are ever eager to discuss their gardens. That is what I had in mind when creating this blog. So stop by my garden gate to find out the latest happenings in my garden.

Happy Gardening!

Garden Gnome
"All my life through, the new sights of Nature made me rejoice like a child." ~ Madame Marie Curie"

Monday, February 09, 2009

Brugmansia


Brugmansia
January 14, 2009

Overlooking one of the grottoes in Hollis Garden (Lakeland, Florida) was an amazingly beautiful flowering shrub with huge, drooping trumpet shaped flowers. Unfortunately I could not get close enough to see if they smelled as heavenly as they looked. When we arrived home I did a little research to identify this flowering shrub. I would love to grow this pretty shrub if at all possible. It is called Brugmansia or commonly Angel's Trumpet.

Brugmansia is a member of the Solanaceae family and is native to the sub-tropical areas of South America. This flowering shrub reaches a height of 3 to 11 metres. The beautiful trumpet shaped flowers range from 14 to 50 cm in size. The flower colour is white, yellow, pink, orange or red. The flowers have a delicate, attractive scent that has slightly lemony overtones. All parts of Brugmansia are poisonous to both humans and animals and can be fatal if ingested. For this reason some municipalities prohibit the purchase, sale or cultivation of Brugmansia. The shrub grows best in moist, fertile, well drained soil in full sun to partial shade, in frost-free climates. Unfortunately our little corner of the earth in Zone 6A is not frost-free so I likely will not be able to grow them. At three metres high the shrub would be to large to bring indoors as well so I will have to settle for enjoying them when we are in Florida.

Happy Gardening!

Garden Gnome
©2006-2009


5 comments:

  1. Just and FYI. Here in Georgia we have these everywhere. Something you can consider is taking a stalk of the plant. It then will root all winter in water. You can then plant in the spring. Then you can have a smaller plant in the fall that will bloom. This is very very common here. We all take stalks off at the end of the year since its what makes the plant grow bigger next year. But we all take the stalk and put it five gallon bucket of water. They root over the winter. You will often time go to garage sales and they are selling or giving these away.
    BTW They really do not smell much! Just look good!!

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  4. This shrub sometimes winters over here in Tennessee. You should have no problem growing it there in your area. It may die back but will return. They are so wonderful. Easy to start from cuttings too. Just ask anyone who has one for a snip if you have a hard time finding it.

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