Neighbours talking over the garden gate has long been a tradition. They share gardening tips, complain about the weather and pests yet are ever eager to discuss their gardens. That is what I had in mind when creating this blog. So stop by my garden gate to find out the latest happenings in my garden.

Happy Gardening!

Garden Gnome
"All my life through, the new sights of Nature made me rejoice like a child." ~ Madame Marie Curie"

Saturday, April 24, 2010

The Meaning of Naturalization in Terms of Gardening

Over the past couple of weeks while discussing various spring bulbs in my gardens I've used the term naturalize or a variation of the word in several of the posts.  In terms of gardening naturalization mean something you planted thrives and spreads with minimal effort on your part aside of the initial planting.  In addition to this, naturalized plants are usually problem, maintenance free and they don't create problems such as providing a rodent habitat.  Plants suitable for naturalization include: some ground covers (eg. snow-in-summer, wild woodruff, Irish moss), spring bulb (eg. narcissus, crocus, tulips), ferns, lily of the valley, many herbs, strawberries, flowering plants (eg. coreopsis, black eyed susans, daisys, coneflower).  Other plants such as English Ivy technically naturalize in that they spread and are maintenance free however these plants are more on the invasive side creating many more problems than they solve.

An easy way to get spring bulbs to naturalize is to toss a handfull of bulbs into the lawn when you are ready to plant in the fall.  Wherever a bulb lands, plant it.  The following year after the bulb has bloomed allow the foliage to completely die down.  This feeds the bulb allowing it to create small bulb offsets as well as produce more blooms the following spring.  The foliage should be dry and a light tan colour that will easily come off with a gentle pull.  After the dead foliage has be removed there is nothing further to do until after the plant blooms the following spring where you repeat the process.  You will be rewarded with large patches of Siberian squill, crocuses, tulips and narcissus from early to late spring before your thoughts turn to looking after your lawn.

Happy Gardening!

Garden Gnome
©2006-2010


5 comments:

  1. wow large patches of Siberian squill?? I like it :)

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  2. Hi Myrna and thanks for visiting :) I'm glad you enjoyed your visit.

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  3. Hi Ninja and thanks for visiting. Large patches of Siberian squill are quite pretty!

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  4. Do you mow over naturaizing plants after they have bloomed?

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